The disembodiment of leadership

I asked on a LinkedIn post recently ‘How would you describe leadership?’ The words I got in response included; enabling, inspiring, self-awareness, humility, authenticity, transparency, resilience, supporting, helping, recognising, empowering, facilitating, influencing, understanding, and nurturing (Sterling, 2019). These words imply a human-centered interest in one’s followers. But as I traverse the world of practitioner discourseContinue reading “The disembodiment of leadership”

Supporting Mothers returning to work

  The 2019 Workplace Diversity Survey (Diversity Works, 2019) reported a significant increase in gender as a diversity concern. But it also highlighted a lack of action in addressing gender issues in the workplace. I’m heartened by this because it means that what I’m researching and writing about is a topical concern for organisations. ButContinue reading “Supporting Mothers returning to work”

A mother is not an ideal worker, and why that matters for everyone

In my experience the term ‘best person for the job’ has been used to rationalise why people are hired, promoted, rewarded and recognised. This is seemingly justified by skills and attributes listed on paper, or even by hiring for ‘cultural fit’. Yet this term ‘best’ is informed by unconscious subtexts that shape decision-making. It isContinue reading “A mother is not an ideal worker, and why that matters for everyone”

The write way

How do you write in an academic context, while challenging the academic constraints, as well as connecting beyond the walls of academia with an audience that can incite change?   Much of what I’m researching for my PhD is emotive and political. It makes me angry, sad, frustrated as I traverse between the polar oppositeContinue reading “The write way”